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Maths

We follow a maths mastery approach at St. George's and as such, we are spending a long time on number (place value), addition and subtraction. When we are secure in the Year 5 concepts, we will move on to incorporating more complex ideas into our lessons, always drawing on previous learning in order to make connections. The aim is to become fluent in number facts, be able to represent what we know in many different ways and make links between areas of knowledge - thus becoming maths masters!

At St. George's, we believe everyone can master maths.

With hard work and encouragement, we can all achieve!

This term's learning


These are our teaching points for these units of learning.

Teaching Point 2.2

Teaching Point 2.3

Teaching Point 2.4

Teaching Point 2.5

Teaching Point 2.6

 

Teaching point 1: Objects can be grouped into equal or unequal groups.
 

Teaching point 2: When describing equally grouped objects, the number of groups and the size of the groups must both be defined.
 

Teaching point 3: Equal groups can be represented with a repeated addition expression.
 

Teaching point 4: Equal groups can be represented with a multiplication expression.
 

Teaching point 5: Multiplication expressions can be written for cases where the groups each contain zero items, and for cases where the groups each contain one item.

 

Teaching point 1: For equally grouped objects, the number of groups is a factor, the group size is a factor, and the overall number of objects is the product; this can be represented with a multiplication equation. Counting in multiples of two can be used to find the product when the group size is two.
 

Teaching point 2: Counting in multiples of two can be represented by the two times table. Adjacent multiples of two have a difference of two. Facts from the two times table can be used to solve problems about groups of two.
 

Teaching point 3: Factor pairs can be written in either order, with the product remaining the same (commutativity).

 

Teaching point 1: Counting in multiples of ten can be represented by the ten times table. Adjacent multiples of ten have a difference of ten. Facts from the ten times table can be used to solve problems about groups of ten.
 

Teaching point 2: Counting in multiples of five can be represented by the five times table. Adjacent multiples of five have a difference of five. Facts from the five times table can be used to solve problems about groups of five.
 

Teaching point 3: Skip counting and grouping can be used to explore the relationship between the five times table and the ten times table.
 

Teaching point 4: When zero is a factor, the product is zero. When one is a factor, the product is equal to the other factor (if there are only two factors.

 

Teaching point 1: The same multiplication equation can have two different grouping interpretations. Problems about two/five/ten equal groups can be solved using facts from the two/five/ten times table. (commutativity)
 

Teaching point 2: If two is a factor, knowledge of doubling facts can be used to find the product; problems about doubling can be solved using facts from the two times table.
 

Teaching point 3: Halving is the inverse of doubling; problems about halving can be solved using facts from the two times table and known doubling facts.
 

Teaching point 4: Products in the ten times table are double the products in the five times table; products in the five times table are half of the products in the ten times table.

 

Teaching point 1: Objects can be grouped equally, sometimes with a remainder.
 

Teaching point 2: Division equations can be used to represent ‘grouping’ problems, where the total quantity (dividend) and the group size (divisor) are known; the number of groups (quotient) can be calculated by skip counting in the divisor. (quotitive division)
 

Teaching point 3: Division equations can be used to represent ‘sharing’ problems, where the total quantity (dividend) and the number we are sharing between (divisor) are known; the size of the shares (quotient) can be calculated by skip counting in the divisor. (partitive division)
 

Teaching point 4: Strategies for finding the quotient, that are more efficient than skip counting, include using known multiplication facts and, when the divisor is two, using known halving facts.
 

Teaching point 5: When the dividend is zero, the quotient is zero; when the dividend is equal to the divisor, the quotient is one; when the divisor is equal to one, the quotient is equal to the dividend.

      Mathletics

I will continue to set Mathletics homework each week. It will be set on Friday and will be due the next Wednesday. It will always complement the work we are doing in class.

https://login.mathletics.com/

Parents, for help using Mathletics please follow the link below:

http://www.3plearning.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/ParentPack_Mathletics-EMEA.pdf?wp-linkindex=2

Children, if you don't understand something, click the 'i' in the top-tight corner. This will give you an explanation if you follow the arrows on the right.

 

 

 

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St George's Church of England Primary School

Coleman Road, Camberwell, London SE57TF

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